VagaBlog

It's easier to go down a mountain than up, but ...

The view is always better from the top.

Mt. Everest, Himalaya, Nepal. Captured by Salon Vagabond. 

Mt. Everest, Himalaya, Nepal. Captured by Salon Vagabond. 

That doesn't mean it was easy to get there. Scaling a mountain literally - or the mountainous challenges in life - is frought with difficulty, peril, and hard work, but the resulting rewards that come from applying oneself to such endeavors make every drop of perspiration worth shedding.

Accomplishment, and her close companion success, don't simply materialize. To attain, there is pursuit. To tromp the path of pursuit to triumph requires dedication, training, creativity, flexibility and a sense of adventure. And the path of pursuit is oft littered with mistakes, failures, obstacles and doubt. It is no small feat to summit a peak, although the smiling and exuberant selfie snapped at that pinnacle moment appears carefree.

So let's debunk the notion of overnight success. If it's your passion, pursue it. It's not a race to the peak. Proceed one step at a time. When you need to: stop, rest, assess. Suddenly a crevasse looms large? Adjust. Get creative. Will you go around, over, under or through?

Smooth sailing is an appreciable condition because it is not always the case. Consider the recent 3,500 mile voyage across the Atlantic completed by James Iverson and crew. The goal, the top of the mountain if you will, was sailing into Portugal where they were toasted with a round. But in an interview with the Herald Times Reporter about the adventure, Iverson recounts the rigorous preparation begun a year in advance of setting sail and some of the intense, nail-biting experiences of the voyage.

When we push ourselves to stretch to new heights, it is worth it. The journey may be treacherous, there may be times you wish you were anywhere but on the mountain, it may seem easier to go down the mountain than up, but the view is always best from the top.

VagaBlog